Unknown, possibly Sophus Holst-Weber, on antisemitic legislation in the Netherlands in 1941

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  1. English
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The situation of the Jews in the Netherlands

The following Regulations etc. contains rules on the Jews’ position

A. Instructions from the Secretary-General of the Ministry of the Interior of 30 September 1940 concerning the Public Administration, etc.

B. Regulation No. 189 on Notification of Enterprises of October 22, 1940.

C. Regulation 231 of 19 December 1940 containing the Prohibition of Employment of Germans in Jewish Households.

D. Regulation No. 6 of 10 January 1941 on Obligations to Report Persons fully or partially of Jewish Blood.

E. Regulations no. 27 and 28 of February 11 1941 on Jewish Students.

F. Regulation No. 48 of 12 March 1941 on Treatment of Notifiable Enterprises, cf. Regulation No. 189 of October 22, 1940.

G. Regulation No. 26 of February 11 1941 on specific safety precautions regarding radios and similar devices.

H. Regulation No. 102 of 27 May 1941 on Notification and Treatment of Land Property in Jewish Hands.

I. Order of the General Commissioner for Security professionals (published on 4.6.1941).

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A. Instruction from the Secretary-General of the Ministry of the Interior of 30 September 1940 regarding public administration, etc. (Note No. 96 of 15 October 1940)

The instructions determine among other things:

1. Persons who are fully or partially of Jewish descent may no longer be employed or promoted.

2. Persons whose spouses are fully or partially of Jewish descent may not be hired or promoted.

3. Persons who marry a Person fully or partially of Jewish descent are immediately dismissed.

According to the instruction, a person is not considered to be a Jew if none of his four grandparents, as far as he is aware, has been a member or is a temporary member of a Jewish congregation.

It should be noted, that it is not clear from the available material whether the said instruction, which sets out another criterion for the concept of the Jew than the subsequent Regulations, has been amended.

B. Regulation No. 189 of 22 October 1940 on Notification of Enterprises (Report No. 145 of 28 November 1940 )

Section 4 of the regulation states the following Criterion for the concept of being a Jew

1. The one who has three full Jewish Grandparents is a Jew.

2. Whoever has two full Jewish Grandparents is considered a Jew when he either

a. on 9 May 1940, belonged to the Jewish Congregation or has joined one at a later date, or

b. on 9 May 1940, was married to a Jew, or was married to one at a later date.

3. A grandfather or mother is considered a Jew immediately if he or she belongs to a Jewish congregation. According to section 2 of the Regulation, the following Companies should be reported to the 'Wirtschaftsprüfstelle':

1. Enterprises singly owned by a Jew

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2. Partnerships, where at least one partner is Jewish.

3. Enterprises operated by legal persons, or limited liability companies, when

a. 1 of the regulators or representative bodies are Jews,

b. 1/4 of the capital or 1/2 of the total number of votes is Jewish.

4. Enterprises operated by Funds and the like, which are subject to the provisions of paragraph 1,2 or 3.

5. Enterprises that are actually under predominantly Jewish influence.

C. Regulation No. 231 of 19/12 1940 containing Prohibition against Employment of Germans in Jewish Households. (Rec. No. 5 of 7 January 1941).

German citizens or persons of German or related descent are prohibited from working in families where a Jew is the head of the family, or where a Jew either permanently or for an uninterrupted period of at least 4 weeks belongs to the Family Community.

D. Regulation No. 6 of 10 January 1941 on the Obligation to Report as Person fully or partially of Jewish Blood. (Rec. No. 21 of January 25, 1941).

People of full or partial Jewish descent must enroll in special registers.

Full or partial Jewish Ancestry also includes people who have 1 full Jewish grandfather or mother (§ 2.1).

Grandparents are clearly considered full-Jewish if they belonged to the Jewish Congregation (§ 22)

In case of doubt, the State Commissioner will decide whether a person is fully or partially a Jew (§ 3).

The notification must be made in writing and contain the person’s data, etc.

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E. Regulations No. 27 and 28 of 11 February 1941 on Jewish Students.

Persons covered by Regulation No. 6 of 10 January 1941, as being fully or partially of Jewish Blood can only be registered with the permission of the Secretary-General of the Ministry of Education.

F. Regulation No. 48 of 12 March 1941 on the Treatment of Notifiable Enterprises, cf. Regulation No. 189 of 22 October 1940 (Record No. 91 of April 10, 1941).

The Regulation contains the following provisions

Permission is required for the creation of new Jewish Enterprises (§ 1).

Sale, Rent, Lease, Abolition of Jewish Enterprises must be approved by the Commissioner-General for Finance and Business (§ 2).

The Commissioner of State may insert Supervisors into Jewish Enterprises (§ 7). These shall control the company at their own initiative and expense unless otherwise decided in each case.

G. Regulation No. 26 of 11 February 1941 on special security measures regarding radios and similar devices.

In accordance with this regulation, it has been imposed on Jews on 29 April 1941 to deliver their Radio equipment to the municipal authorities. (Indb. No. 128 of 8 May 1941)

H. Regulation No. 102 of 27 May 1941 on Notification and Treatment of Land Property in Jewish Hands. (Note. No. 203 of 8.7.)

The regulation includes properties that are commercially operated as country, garden, forest or fishing farms, whether owned on 9 May 1940 or later owned by a Jew, or a Jew is or after 9 May 1940 has been the Owner or Holder of property rights over the Property, including as Lessor, Holder or Co-Holder of Special Exercise Rights (§ 1).

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Land properties must be reported (§ 2,1 cf. 4) to the Leasing Offices before 30 June 1941, even if they have been notified in accordance with Regulation No. 189 of 22 October 1940 on notification of Enterprises. Notification must be made by the authorized person, the Proprietor or Persons authorized to represent him. If a Property is sold before the regulation has been enforced (31 May 1941), the Acquirer is also obliged to give notice (§ 2.2).

The notification must include the various legal conditions of the Property (Property Relationships, Leases, and Special Benefits), as well as all Liabilities as well as the Time and Conditions of the Acquisition. (§ 3).

Land, to which the regulation applies, must be sold by 1 September 1941, in case of Notar’s Compliance and Buyer's Accession by 1 January 1942 (§ 5). The deals must be approved by a special body set up by the Ministry of Agriculture and Fishing (§ 6), which may, however, grant exemption from the provisions of the Regulation (§ 11). The Approval must ensure that a healthy distribution of soil is achieved and that the tenant’s access to acquire the property is facilitated by Provisions regarding Pricing, Deferral of Purchase Amount, Freezing of Mortgages, and Preclusion of Unclaimed Mortgages (§ 7).

If the Property is operated by a Company (§ 8) the approval pursuant is required to § 2 of Regulation No. 48 of 12 March 1941 on the Treatment of Notifiable Enterprises, cf. Regulation No. 189 of 12 October 1940.

If a Jew or a Jewish Enterprises is Leaseholder or similar of a country estate, the relationship shall be dissolved regardless of any conflicting provisions of law or contract, ending the financial year the regulation comes into effect (§ 10).

It is prohibited to sell the Property Accessories separately (§ 12).

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I. Executive Order from the General Security Commission (published 4 June 1941) (Report No. 203 by 9 July 41).

According to the order, Jews are prohibited from bathing in public oceans — Beaches — Swimming Pools or Baths. They may not enter public facilities, premises, rooms, or hotel rooms, guesthouses, at Baths and Spas etc. Furthermore, they are not allowed as spectators, to watch horseracing.

References

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The German army occupied Denmark on 9 April 1940. Until 1943, the occupation regime appeared relatively benign: It dominated foreign policy, but allowed the Danish government complete autonomy in domestic affairs, including control of the legal system and police forces. The tone of the German occupation changed in early 1943. Rather than yield to German demands, the Danish government resigned on 29 August 1943. German authorities took direct control of the Danish military and police forces. Othe...

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